Cavachons from The Monarchy


Cavachons from The Monarchy 
100 Maybrook Road
Holland, MA 01521
413-893-9012 or 413-455-4374

cavachons@themonarchy.com

appearance

1)  I have placed a deposit with you for a Cavachon puppy.  What happens next?

Once the Cavachon puppies are born, we notify those who are at the top of the list to let them know that a litter was born.  We will offer you a puppy from that litter based on your preferences taken from your purchases contract. If that puppy is not in the then current litter, you may pass this litter and wait for the next litter.  If  you have stated you are flexible in terms of gender and/or color, we will offer you another choice if another choice is available in the same litter.  If the puppy you want is in the litter or if there is more than one puppy in the litter fitting your description in the litter, you will be allowed to choose which of those puppies you want, if you are ahead of someone else who wants the same described puppy.   We will work with each family in order, by date of deposit and keeping stated preferences in mind. Starting with the first week, we will help each family choose their puppy so that everyone on the wait list can make their choices over the next few weeks.  Because of the two genders and so many combinations of colors, there is usually only one puppy or two puppies at the most to choose from at any given time. We send out photos every weekend, so that you can watch the puppies grow!  We'll let you know how they are progressing.  All immunizations and dewormings are done as per vet's schedule, and socialization starts the day the puppies are born--with much human handling.  We also employ neurological based stimulation which you can read more about on our website. The weekend that you can begin to visit your own puppy for active play will be at approximately 7 weeks of age, depending upon the progress of the puppies.  No visits can take place until the age of 7 weeks or with special arrangements in unusual cases.  We wait as long as we can to let them develop so that their immune systems are strong enough to protect them from foreign germs and bacteria.   At seven weeks and thereafter, you can visit your puppy so that you can get to know him/her.  Special arrangements can be made for you to see the puppies early on, but you will not be able to handle them.  In all fairness to the person on the list just below you, we encourage you to work with us during the first several weeks to decide on your puppy.  Prior to this time, we will give you a description of each puppy's coat color, coat type, estimated size when born, facial features, and energy level. If you are able to visit us to select your puppy, we'll schedule a time for you. If you find that there is not a puppy with the specific gender or color you desire, your reservation will go to the next litter or another litter of your choosing!  We want you to have the puppy you want!   The selection process will always be by order and date of deposit and guided by preferences as indicated on your purchase agreement.

Then, when the puppies are 8 weeks old they will be ready to go to their new homes.  Local families will be able to pick up their puppies on the designated weekend at the end of the 8 weeks -- the 'go home' time.  The puppies that fly to new homes via specialized carriers will be flown when our courier is available and we ask for flexibility with this. We take care of all the details, reservations and other preparations to get our puppies safe and sound to their new families.

2)  Can you tell me more about visiting your farm, do you have general visiting hours?

Families often ask to visit our puppies or drop by to visit.  We certainly understand the desire to see a breeder's facility, their parent dogs and to meet the breeders.  Most of the time, you are more than welcome to come and meet us and see parent dogs and if puppies are older than 7 weeks, you can play with the puppies too!  However, we have been advised by our vet that we must limit the number of visitors we have and that puppies should not be exposed until they are at least  7 weeks of age, after their first immunizations.  There is a real danger that diseases can migrate into the farm and our exercise yard and puppies that are not yet vaccinated will be susceptible to these viruses and bacteria that can then spread through the whelping area and exercise pens.  Thank you for understanding our protective policy.

3)   What will I get with my Cavachon puppy?

What you get with your purchase of a Cavachon puppy from The Monarchy:
 

  • Two-year health guarantee for all life threatening and/or debilitating genetic faults;
  • Early Medicals:    1st immunization, thorough deworming treatments; 
  • Early Socialization -   Daily, hands-on socialization with adults, elementary-age and high-school age children who carefully play with the puppies--from birth until the day they leave the farm; Bio-sensor/early neurological stimulation and exercises;
  • Puppy Folder with health record detailing treatments given with dates and product names, parent pedigree registrations if so desired, puppy care materials; 
  • Starter bag of high quality puppy food (kibble); 
  • A Collar to 'grow' with the puppy for at least a month, a puppy leash;
  • Scent cloth and/or toy for memory of mother dog and siblings, to put in your puppy's crate 
  • Sample bag of training treats;
  • Puppy Teething Ring and or comparable 'chew.'


4)  Cavachon Puppy - Male or Female?

Now that you have made a choice about purchasing a Cavachon puppy, you may be trying to decide something more basic.  Do you want a male or a female?  There are old sayings and myths that continue to circulate among dog aficioinados.  However, one thing that you must take into account when making this evaluation, is the role played by cultural stereotypes.  If men or women have particular concepts about each other, they may have a tendency to project those concepts onto animals in a way that is not entirely appropriate.  And of course, those stereotypes may not be appropriate when applied to the opposite sex in humans either.  Most importantly, we must keep in mind that when we speak of the differences that may really exist between male and female dogs, it should be understood that these are generalities.  While a male or female Cavachon puppy may be more likely to possess a certain characteristic or behavioral trait, this does not mean these generalities apply in every case. 

All dog breeders and trainers agree on one thing, the personality differences between individual dogs are definitely greater than that which may exist between the sexes. 

That being said, let's look at some differences that appear to exist.  Males can tend to be more wanting of attention, more affectionate, frisky and focused on human beings than female dogs who are a bit more independent in their focus on their human companions.  Males may crave more affection.  Females can be every bit as loving, but unlike their male counterparts, they may be particularly fond of one special person in the family.  Males, on the other hand are 'buddies with everyone.' 

Cavachons, as far as temperament, are equally gentle, both females and males.  Having your dog spayed or neutered makes a behavior difference in both sexes.  Males should be neutered between 5 and 5 1/2 months.  This will stop dominance behavior in both sexes, such as marking territories.  Please know that females will also mark their territory, it is not only males.  Training your female or male Cavachons . . . in the competitive world of dog shows and related events, when it comes time to hand out prizes and titles, it is male dogs that have traditionally dominated.  It could be that male dogs may be more eager to please human beings and perhaps this helps them overcome a tendency to be goofy and sometimes distracted.  It is also possible that training female dogs for competition is too challenging for many because they could be distracted and not prime for training for legitimate reasons:  such as during the times they are in heat.  Perhaps things would be different in the competitive world if spaying and neutering were the norm for competitive dogs, but this is not the case.

So this counters, somewhat, the belief that male dogs have a tendency to remain like goofy, playful kids and that it can be difficult for them to sometimes focus on training for extended periods. 

5)  We have a dog, should I get a male or female puppy to go with it?

If you have a male, either will be fine.  If you have a female (they can be a bit more territorial with their people) we would advise getting a male.

6)  What do we need to buy for our new puppy?

You will need to purchase a Number of items for your puppy.  As soon as you are on our wait list, you will receive our "Welcome to Puppyhood Manual" which contains a thorough supplies list as well as many topics and advice on how to care for your Cavachon when he/she comes home.  We are continually revising our "Welcome to Puppyhood Manual" to address concerns and questions of our adoptive families. 
 
7)  Is it safe to send my Cavachon puppy through the airlines?

This question is appreciated, it lets us know that you are caring, responsible adopters.  It took us a long time to think that sending a puppy via the airlines was an ok thing to do.  After much research which included speaking with the USDA (they regulate the interstate shipping of live animals); touring and speaking with airline staff, speaking with other breeders and talking with people that received puppies, we decided that for very short flights with no connections or plane changes and with no concern for hot or freezing weather, it is safe. 

However, we are fortunate to be able to hand carry our puppies aboard the airplane and accompany them (inside the regular cabin) to their destination.  The fee for our families will be the regular cost of round trip airfare plus approximately $150 to bring the puppy on board.  We do not charge for our own time to deliver the puppy; it is only the airfare.

8)  Do we need to hire an in-home dog trainer for our Cavachon puppy?

If you have children under the age of 10 years, we strongly recommend the use of an in-home dog trainer.  This dog trainer will know how to teach your child, along with your puppy, the ins and outs of basic manners and careful play with the new puppy.  Obedience training is the secret to making a good puppy into a truly great dog.  We strongly recommend a minimum of three in-home training sessions soon after the puppy arrives . . . for families with young children.  Adults can benefit as well.  Later on, when your puppy has had all of its immunizations, you can continue with group obedience training sessions.  Check this association's website to find a trainer in your area who uses only positive reinforcement.
 
International Association of Canine Professionals:  www.canineprofessiionals.com/Public/FindAProfessional.aspx

9)  Do Cavachons like children?

Introducing Your Cavachon to a Young Child  Few images are as evocative of trust, loyalty, friendship and playfulness as a child with a puppy. The bonds formed between a young puppy and a child can be made incredibly strong when the relationship is formed early on. That being said, it’s very important that children be taught how to interact safely and responsibly with their canine companions. We strongly recommend that families with children under the age of 10 (as stated above) consider utilizing a personal dog trainer who will come into your home and work with your child, your family and the Cavachon puppy. Reputable and professional personal dog trainers in your local community can be found through the IACP (International Association of Canine Professionals) website. Click HERE to enter their website. You will be able to enter your zip code to find trainers in your area.                                                              

Cavachons, like their mothers, the Bichon, adore children and also other animals. Bichons are especially playful and once were circus dogs, displaying their playful nature. The Cavalier King Charles puppy was recently named among the top 10 breeds for companion dogs for children. They have a laid back personality, are devoted, loyal and are happy sitting on someone’s lap all day! These traits, of both the Bichon and the Cavalier, are what make the Cavachon puppy an especially well-suited dog for a child. At the beginning, the introduction between the Cavachon puppy and your young child should be delayed until the child’s excitement has passed and he or she is in a calm state of mind, able to focus on adult instruction. Never allow your young child to make the first move. Keep an eye on the child’s energy levels and note the Cavachon puppy’s reactions. Once you are satisfied that the situation is safe and under your control, show the child the proper way to give affection. Don’t be afraid to say no . . . if the situation appears unsafe for the puppy (or the child), inform the child that the puppy is in training and can’t be pet just yet. Keep an eye on the scene at all times! Puppies and young children should never be left alone together without adult supervision. Set some ground rules for off-limits play. Be sure that the child understands not to pull the puppy’s ears or tail. Keep watch for signs of rough play, and correct the child or redirect his or her energy when needed. Observe the puppy’s body language. Step in when you believe the puppy has had enough of playtime. Children are more vulnerable than grown-ups to the illnesses that pets can carry. Here are some helpful tips to avoid risks to your family’s health. Make sure your Cavachon puppy sees a vet regularly. Make sure your child washes his or her hands thoroughly both before and after playtime. Do not allow playtime around or near the areas where the puppy or dog relieves himself. Any and all excrement should be picked up from the lawn and surrounding areas frequently and properly disposed of. We cannot stress enough that, regardless of breed, most dogs raised with children and with proper training, can learn to be a wonderful childhood companion. Please remember that the personality of a dog is often influenced by several factors including line, breeder, and owner more so than the actual breed of the dog. Puppy training is of paramount importance with children; early socialization with children (provided by the breeder before you bring your puppy home) and living conditions with the new family will, also, heavily influence your dog’s personality with your young child. We hope this will begin to take you and your family on a loving path to a wonderful experience with your new puppy and well into adulthood and his or her senior years! As always, please call us with any questions. If we do not have the answer, we will find the answer and point you in the right direction.   
  
10.  Aside from socialization, what kind of "Puppy Prep" will my Puppy get before 8 weeks of age?

Cute is not the first word you think of when describing newborn puppies.  Born unable to hear or see, with smushed in faces and twitchy little bodies, they look for all the world, like diminutive aliens, detached and distant visitors from another planet, they are in their own orbit, seeking only warmth, milk, and the rough caress of their mother's tongue.  Nothing, of course, could be further from the truth!

From the time they are born, puppies are gathering, processing and synthesizing huge amounts of information from the world around them.  It is known that puppies need intense socialization before they leave their human caretakers for their forever homes, but little is said about the importance of thoughtful, consistent exposure to new stimuli in their first eight weeks of life.  However, things are different here, at The Monarchy!  We consider ourselves to be forward thinking breeders and know that while temperament is certainly hereditary, early experience can dramatically modify brain development, stress tolerance, stability and reactivity.  Progressive breeders will use techniques to help maximize the neurological and behavioral development of their explorer puppies.  Progressive breeders will provide safe and fun experiences for the puppies to expand their horizons, stretch their bodies and minds, and learn that novelty brings good things.  This is an investment we make in the puppies' lives that sets us apart from other breeders.  Our program of early neurological stimulation is based on the "Bio Sensor" or "Super Dog" program developed by the U.S. military in the 1970's. 

"...It has been shown that breeders should be guided by the rule that it is generally considered prudent to guard against under and over stimulation...  During their first two months of life, a conservative approach would be to expose them to children, people, toys and other animals on a regular basis. Handling and touching all parts of their anatomy is also a necessary part of their learning which can be started as early as the third day of life. Pups that are handled early and on a regular basis generally do not become hand-shy as adults."

- Dr. Carmen L. Battaglia, Comments on Early Neurological Stimulation

For a complete description, with pictures, of our early neurological stimulation program, click HERE:
 

11.  Is it necessary to have a crate cover for the dog’s crate? 

 At night, it would be very appropriate to partially cover the crate with your puppy or dog ready to sleep.  This will help to calm your puppy down and it will create a ‘cave’ atmosphere! We notice a calming effect once evening comes, the puppy needs to sleep in his crate and it is then covered, partially,  with a blanket or sheet.  During the day, the crate should be airy and at least partially uncovered so that the pup, when resting or taking some time for himself, still feels as though he is a part of the family.  You do not need to invest in a special cover because anything simple will work.  

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Cavachon Puppies - Q & A